Known for riding off the front of group rides only to be caught in the first mile, CJ got back on a road bike and realized he must win the Donut Derby at least once in his life. Regularly pledging he's "not a climber," he can be found as a regular attendee of Trexlertown's Thursday Night Training Criterium or sitting on the couch watching Paris-Roubaix reruns. CJ has been a constant rider of the Hell of Hunterdon in New Jersey and races the Tour of the Battenkill before going into seasonal hiding on cross-country ski trails.

Review: K-Edge Garmin Race Mount ($55 USD)

Review: K-Edge Garmin Race Mount ($55 USD)

A sage mechanic once shared a joke with me what Air Force One was. While it is a plane that ferries the president of the United States, there is a reputation in the cycling world that earns the moniker. To earn this distinction, one will qualify with several (or all) of the following variations splayed across the handlebars: cyclo-computer, horn/ bell, Garmin, GoPro mount, watch, RoadID, and/ or a light. I have bore witness to several bikes termed ‘Air Force One’ because of the amount of electronics between the rider’s hands. One submission even asked to have a second set of shifters installed on the end of clip-in tri bars alongside the standard road shifters. That's a whole different level.

 

IMG_2821.JPG

I will admit I have been out of the cyclo-computer game for quite some time. My last computer was discarded when I realized I was incapable of going for an enjoyable ride. The pacing triangle kept encouraging me to go faster than my average speed, I had to get farther than the previous ride, or I couldn’t leave the house without it. It took over my cycling world and shaded what was important: enjoying time on the bike. I pathetically apologize to those who rode with me all those years ago when I fired off the front with the hopes of finishing along some professional average speed.

 

With the recent addition to cycling accessories including a computer I was my usual selective self when it came to a computer mount. Prior to this exploration of handlebar accessories my bars were free of any static. I had nothing to look down at other than my front tire. Recently I added a computer and corresponding mount. And while I was accepting of the Garmin mount that came with the computer, I wanted something unique and stylish but also reserved and conservative. I did not want to slowly migrate into the realm of ‘Air Force One.’

 

There are two differences between the standard issue Garmin mount and the K-Edge Race Mount. The first is weight. I’m not one to care about grams but for those asking the Garmin mount (with gasket) clocked in at 38 grams. The svelte K-Edge came in at 31.5 grams. The second difference is that the Garmin mounts on the left side of the handlebars while the K-Edge positions itself on the right. Perhaps I should keep the Garmin in case I want to mount a GoPro. Wait a minute! It’s happening!

 

In the several rides between the two mounts I naturally justified the addition of the K-Edge mount. For starters it is quality machined in the United States by a company that started in chain catchers. Any time a bike needed to meet weight a K-Edge was the first choice in packing on extra grams. Because the mount is quality machined it looks nice too. Having red Chris King hubs and a red Wheels Manufacturing bottom bracket, I naturally went with the red mount. It’s one of those little details to make it stand out or fade into the distance. Either way, this mount works.

  A simple single allen bolt holds the K-Edge Race Mount in place. Without the ability to hold a GoPro this mount is extremely slender in design and features dramatic lines and edges.

A simple single allen bolt holds the K-Edge Race Mount in place. Without the ability to hold a GoPro this mount is extremely slender in design and features dramatic lines and edges.

One of the complaints about Garmins is the start/ stop button being difficult to access with its proximity to the handlebar. I found no issue starting or stopping the ride even with thick winter gloves on. The K-Edge keeps the computer neatly out front and in a rightful sightline. This mount fits 31.8mm handlebars; so make sure yours is the right circumference.

 

The mount was installed within a minute. All that was needed was a slight adjustment to get the computer to an appropriate viewing angle. I hardly think about the aerodynamic qualities of the mount. I’m more concerned about seeing the screen. Since this is a race mount there are no places underneath for a GoPro to snap into. Being that I do not own one this is not an issue. I’m sure with my riding style all my videos would feature vacant roads of solo rides or the back of the peloton as I fell off the pace. Hardly publishable material.

 

Perhaps the Garmin mount is good enough but for an extra detail this mount does the trick. It may not make me as fast as a 747 armed with enough technology to power New York City, but I get a kick when I glance down at my Garmin and see the K-Edge mount just off to the side. It might be aero, but at least it doesn’t come with four General Electric engines. I’m ok with that for now. 

 

 

K-Edge Race Mounts can be purchased at your local bike shop. Be sure to support your local bike shop for other items including Garmin computers and GoPro cameras.

Events: 2018 Goldsprints Presented by Doylestown Bike Works

Events: 2018 Goldsprints Presented by Doylestown Bike Works

Review: Rapha Pro Team Thermal Base Layer ($100 USD)

Review: Rapha Pro Team Thermal Base Layer ($100 USD)