Known for riding off the front of group rides only to be caught in the first mile, CJ got back on a road bike and realized he must win the Donut Derby at least once in his life. Regularly pledging he's "not a climber," he can be found as a regular attendee of Trexlertown's Thursday Night Training Criterium or sitting on the couch watching Paris-Roubaix reruns. CJ has been a constant rider of the Hell of Hunterdon in New Jersey and races the Tour of the Battenkill before going into seasonal hiding on cross-country ski trails.

Review: Lazer Aeroshell

Review: Lazer Aeroshell

(2016) A couple of years ago, while working in a bike shop, one of the jazzy accouterments a helmet could have was the clip on/ clip off visor. It seriously wowed more people than I thought necessary. As the years rolled on, nothing major came from the helmet industry that tantalized purchasers one way or another (not even those day glo shower caps swayed buyers). Not to mention having a conversation about potential crashes usually had people on a schedule. Once they got really anxious they would ask for whichever helmet I was talking about and make their way to the register.

 

Lazer has come along to change that. In recent years their helmets have become more versatile than just head protection. Lazer thinks helmets can do better service to riders than they’ve been doing. The Z1 road helmet is just the starting point for accessorizing the next ride. We’ve been sporting a Z1 for quite some time and find the fit, comfort, and design to be a refreshing mix-up in the world of like-minded helmets.

  The front view of the Aeroshell after snapping it on the helmet. It took all of five seconds to snap it on.

The front view of the Aeroshell after snapping it on the helmet. It took all of five seconds to snap it on.

Recently Lazer released news regarding their submission in the aero helmet pool, but what if a cyclist isn’t interested in a less vented helmet? Lazer’s got you covered.

 

Watching any spring classic this past season and the blatant word AEROSHELL could be seen from kilometers away. Andre Greipel and the Lotto-Soudal were seen regularly snapping a shield to the tops of their helmets. Immediately upon that release a few years ago, viewers and cyclists took notice. Finally a solution to several problems in one easy snap on shield.

 

Should the ride risk a bit of precipitation the Lazer Aeroshell can help reduce the amount of rain (or snow) that would make its way the scalp. A simple snap of the Aeroshell turns the Z1 from a well-vented helmet to an aero helmet quite quickly. Want to temporarily change the color of your helmet? That's easy to do with the five shield colors, not including the hard-to-find Lion of Flanders Aeroshell. Are the fall conditions cool and windy? The Aeroshell works wonders in keeping the wind out and some of the heat in.

 

That last scenario is just what I found myself in yesterday when I rejoined weekend rides with our long-lost hero Mike. Two benefits are apparent, one immediate. The first benefit is just how thin and flimsy the Aeroshell is. It adds next to no weight to the helmet. Some snap on shields from other companies have remarkable sized shells that add a bit of weight. Perhaps, too, the Aeroshell is designed to disintegrate should an impact happen so as to not interfere with the helmet’s sole job.

  The inside view with the Aeroshell snapped on. The vents on the front 2/3s of the helmet are covered completely.

The inside view with the Aeroshell snapped on. The vents on the front 2/3s of the helmet are covered completely.

The second benefit was noted in a tailwind of all things. With gusty winds being enjoyed, I was curious as to just how firm the Aeroshell grasped the helmet. With several tail and side gusts, I am happy to report that the shield didn’t even wince at the wind. There was not flapping or suggestions of it coming off. With the added bonus of purchasing the bright orange Aeroshell, it adds noticeability to any motorist looking to cross the path of any cyclist. That certainly helps in low light fall conditions.

 

I’m still not sold on an aero helmet as being a one-shot-deal. I don't have the firepower recently to defend wearing one at the Trexlertown Derby. I certainly don't want 'the look' from someone as they ride past me after being dropped wondering why I sported such a helmet. They certainly work for anyone who averages over 20 miles per hour on a regular basis or those among us who want one helmet for crit races and time trials. Lazer has added features such as built in heart rate monitors and colored straps, but it’s obvious the first accessory to get is the Aeroshell given its multiple uses. When I was riding with Mike yesterday I kept telling him that I know I’m still fresh because of the wattage savings from having the aerodynamic shield snapped to my helmet. Oh who am I kidding? We all know it’s the motor in my bike that allows me to keep up with him. But at least my head is a bit warmer in the process.

 

The Lazer Aeroshell sells for around $20 (USD). Lazer can be purchased through QBP meaning most bike shops can special order it if they don't carry already. Always visit your local bike shop first.

Events: Philadelphia and Pittsburgh Dirty Dozen

Events: Philadelphia and Pittsburgh Dirty Dozen

Review: Spitting in the Soup – Inside the Dirty Game of Doping in Sports (Velo Press)

Review: Spitting in the Soup – Inside the Dirty Game of Doping in Sports (Velo Press)