Known for riding off the front of group rides only to be caught in the first mile, CJ got back on a road bike and realized he must win the Donut Derby at least once in his life. Regularly pledging he's "not a climber," he can be found as a regular attendee of Trexlertown's Thursday Night Training Criterium or sitting on the couch watching Paris-Roubaix reruns. CJ has been a constant rider of the Hell of Hunterdon in New Jersey and races the Tour of the Battenkill before going into seasonal hiding on cross-country ski trails.

Review: Hincapie Fahrenheit Jacket

Review: Hincapie Fahrenheit Jacket

(2016) Products that serve multiple modalities become more enjoyable strictly because they can be used more. One of the great aspects of the sport of cycling is its close alignment to other sports wear, specifically cross-country skiing. If a cyclist lives in an area where the two sports are capable of crossing over, careful consideration is taken in attire. Selecting garments that can pull double duty is always an attractive selling point.  

Take for example the Hincapie Fahrenheit Jacket. I got a hold of this jacket a while ago and I have yet to grow tired of it. On one ride specifically I found the chill of stopping at a coffee shop to be a little too crisp. This prompted me to pull out the jacket and wear it a-ways down the road. It has many attributes going for it: It’s warm, it fits well, it stows well, and it’s stylish off the bike.

Pulling this jacket on while riding down the road means it must be cold out. Conversely not having this jacket in the back pocket could spell the end of a ride. This isn’t something to take along with a dedicated winter jacket; this is something to take if it’s drastically colder in the morning and forecasted to be much warmer by early afternoon. Around these parts the jacket comes in handy when plunging down to the Delaware River where the temperature can fluctuate wildly.

  The Hincapie Fahrenheit Jacket when stuffed into its pouch.

The Hincapie Fahrenheit Jacket when stuffed into its pouch.

When on, the jacket has great aspects going for it. The sleeves are cut for the cycling position. The back of the jacket is longer to prevent riding up the back. It also has a chest pocket for an item that needs quick attention. Yet the jacket doesn’t flap around. The front of the jacket is kept close to the chest while holding onto the hoods. The sleeves stay in place. With simple elastic cuffs it makes can hold its place on the wrist or on the cuff of a glove. This jacket is designed for riding with excellent attention to detail.

Once the jacket has warmed up the rider it becomes a quick and easy process of scrunching it into the internal pocket. Once deflated and stowed, the jacket easily fits into a jersey pocket for later use if necessary. It’s a simple solution, and it eliminates the decision between underdressing and being cold or overdressing and sweating. Stow this in the pocket and pull it out when needed adds miles to training.

This is where the jacket performs multiple tasks. Off the bike the jacket is warm on spring days and winter storms alike. Use it for the drive home after a long winter training ride. Use it to shovel snow. Use it to cross-country ski. These are all uses for the Hincapie Fahrenheit Jacket. With the subtle Hincapie logo, only other cyclists will recognize the gear choice at either the pub or convenience store.

The puff jacket is an ideal consideration for riding. At $160 (USD) for the jacket ($140 for the vest) this is an important piece of winter gear. Call it a cycling purchase, or spectator purchase, or even a walk-the-dogs purchase. Rest assured it will keep the wearer warm on the bike, on the curb, or around the block.

Events: Winter Goldsprints hosted by Doylestown Bike Works

Events: Winter Goldsprints hosted by Doylestown Bike Works

Rides We Like: (Tried) The Snow Day Ride

Rides We Like: (Tried) The Snow Day Ride