Known for riding off the front of group rides only to be caught in the first mile, CJ got back on a road bike and realized he must win the Donut Derby at least once in his life. Regularly pledging he's "not a climber," he can be found as a regular attendee of Trexlertown's Thursday Night Training Criterium or sitting on the couch watching Paris-Roubaix reruns. CJ has been a constant rider of the Hell of Hunterdon in New Jersey and races the Tour of the Battenkill before going into seasonal hiding on cross-country ski trails.

Review: Peloton Cold Brew Coffee

Review: Peloton Cold Brew Coffee

(2015) Returning from a warm mid-morning ride deserves a cold beverage to help the recovery process. With the numerous options out there, cold brew coffee has started to move to the front as the next ‘in’ thing for coffee drinkers. Mind you, this isn't hot coffee that's been refrigerated, it's a longer process and different taste. I could have predicted my urge to have cold coffee twelve hours prior to the finish of my outing, but I also ran the risk of having the ratios off or the grinds passing through the filtration process. I could also want more but would have to wait for a once-around-the-clock holding period. If I wanted less, well, that never happens. Or I could put a pot of coffee on and continue sweating out the ride while seated at the table recounting the covered bridges crossed.

  The pace of the peloton must not be that fast since they're not strung out. Or, it's a bunch sprint.

The pace of the peloton must not be that fast since they're not strung out. Or, it's a bunch sprint.

Instead, just the other day the Missus brought home two bottles as a surprise. Thinking they were stouts with cyclists on it, a closer inspection revealed a just as suitable substitute: cold brew coffee from Whole Foods. I decided to save them for a post-ride taste test. Since it was warm out when I rolled up the driveway, this would be a nice way to wind down the Sunday. The Peloton Cold Brew Coffee label kept with the two-wheel theme for the day. The fact that it was brewed nearby in West Chester, PA was the bonus. It was certainly a great find.

Cracking open the bottle could create a double take. There is no satisfying ‘ksssk’ from the cap as in carbonated beverage bottles. The cap just pops off quietly and releases a wonderful aroma of coffee.

  Peloton pours a nice dark color and looks good in the Hell of Hunterdon glass.

Peloton pours a nice dark color and looks good in the Hell of Hunterdon glass.

Today I kept it basic and poured it over standard ice cubes. It was fantastic to sip. It lived up to the label’s claim that it would be refreshing. Since it’s been cold pressed, the acidity had fallen away to make a soft landing on the tongue to give an easy coffee experience. Peloton Cold Brew Coffee claims the Ethiopian beans are steeped for an entire day followed by three rounds of filtration. This culmination is how a summer post-ride should be.

The backside of the label suggested other ways to serve it such as with milk, out of the bottle, or even warmed up. I thought of sacrificing a bottle by pouring it into an ice cube tray to create the ultimate cold coffee experience. Today I did consider trying it with milk, but I’m just a black coffee kind of person.

  The four serving suggestion icons on the label.

The four serving suggestion icons on the label.

While cold pressed coffee can be made at home, having it at the ready in bottle format is convenient. It’s also something that could create a conundrum at the local stops when shelved with other conveniently bottled beverages. The flavor is so crisp that it just might get selected over those other choices. It goes down so easily and, with its low acidiy, may not cause digestion issues after the coffee stop. Perhaps bike shops and coffee stops will start stocking these bottles. Having it made locally, and keeping with the bike theme, this will fit nicely on the shelves of each establishment.

Essay: On the Oft-Ridden Route

Essay: On the Oft-Ridden Route

Review: The Sufferfest’s Nine Hammers

Review: The Sufferfest’s Nine Hammers