Known for riding off the front of group rides only to be caught in the first mile, CJ got back on a road bike and realized he must win the Donut Derby at least once in his life. Regularly pledging he's "not a climber," he can be found as a regular attendee of Trexlertown's Thursday Night Training Criterium or sitting on the couch watching Paris-Roubaix reruns. CJ has been a constant rider of the Hell of Hunterdon in New Jersey and races the Tour of the Battenkill before going into seasonal hiding on cross-country ski trails.

Review: Ass-Savers, the Clip-on Cycling Attachment

Review: Ass-Savers, the Clip-on Cycling Attachment

(2015) In another why-didn’t-I-think-of-that-moment? I easily snapped on the Ass-Savers accessory after a recent rainstorm passed through the area. This simple plastic blade that needs no parts whatsoever got its start in Sweden. It’s cheap, it’s fully customizable, and really, this review doesn’t need to be too long. It’s that convenient.

  Without the need for tools, the Ass-Saver snap-on fender goes on quickly.   The device slides past the seat post and snaps on the railing in the front of the saddle. The cutout in the saddle is blocked by the Ass-Saver.

Without the need for tools, the Ass-Saver snap-on fender goes on quickly. The device slides past the seat post and snaps on the railing in the front of the saddle. The cutout in the saddle is blocked by the Ass-Saver.

As stated in a previous write-up, I was given an Ass-Saver as SWAG gear for the Hell of Hunterdon. Since it was dry that day I tucked it behind the zipper of my jersey to keep the morning cold breeze out. This could be a duel-purpose device because it certainly kept out any creeping wind.

As the spring catapulted into summer I forgot about my simple device and proceeded to ride many miles around my county without necessitating its use. That is, until the muggy weather moved in and has yet to release its grip on the area.

  After removing the Ass-Saver, this is what it looks like when bent as instructed. It comes as a flat piece of plastic, so shipping is easy if one were interested in using this as an advertisement.

After removing the Ass-Saver, this is what it looks like when bent as instructed. It comes as a flat piece of plastic, so shipping is easy if one were interested in using this as an advertisement.

This could have been a tale of woe: Rider waits at the door watching morning storm move through, rider evaluates the dryness of the road, rider aborts ride because the roads are wet with high humidity. But it turned into a tale of woo: Rider remembers Ass-Saver, rider snaps it on in under ten seconds, rider rolls out moments later, rider’s backside is kept dry despite passing through puddles and wet road segments.

It’s so simple, both parts. Fold the plastic blade in the two instructed areas; mount the blade under the saddle, and in no time at all a simple solution has altered the ride before it even happens. The work of the Ass-Saver blocks the rear tire spray. The part that was found extremely delightful was the cutout blockage portion of the Ass-Saver. It is my opinion that the cutout spray is the most aggravating part of riding in wet weather. The spray gorges the chamois making rest stops a difficult prospect. Who wants to walk around with saggy bibs? Not a problem for Ass-Savers.

If it’s so inexpensive, why not invest in it? Something that costs about $8 can prevent much of the riding discomfort in less-than-desirable conditions. Its ease of transport, its quick application, and its simple use make it an absolute no-brainer. While it doesn’t fully eliminate backside spray onto the following rider, one may find riders more inclined to jump on your back wheel when the weather turns soupy. With a device that’s 100% recyclable and 100% satisfaction or a full refund, why not spend the equivalent of a replacement tube to keep your backside dry?

  The directions are located on the underside. This also shows some of the road grit that was prevented from flying up. Mind you, this was a sunny day with a couple of puddles and damp road conditions.

The directions are located on the underside. This also shows some of the road grit that was prevented from flying up. Mind you, this was a sunny day with a couple of puddles and damp road conditions.

Stops We Love: Homestead Coffee Roasters

Stops We Love: Homestead Coffee Roasters

Review: Veloflex Master Clincher 23mm/ 25mm Gumwall

Review: Veloflex Master Clincher 23mm/ 25mm Gumwall